Stephen Collie Enterprises New Zealand

Caught the travel bug? If wanderlust is calling, sometimes the only solution is to answer it. Many people move overseas with no long-term plan, figuring out how to earn money as they travel. Others leave to find new opportunities for supporting their families. No matter what drives you to leave home, there are plenty of options for earning money while on the road.

A word of caution: make sure to research what you are legally permitted to do under your visa restrictions. Some countries will revoke your tourist visa if they find that you’re working without permission. Whether you’re traveling to work, or working to travel, here’s how to earn money while exploring the world.

Get a remote job

So-called “digital nomads” are taking the world by storm. Digital nomads, those who can work from anywhere and choose to take their office on the road, are on the rise. In 2018, research revealed that 4.8 million US citizens identify with digital nomads. At least 43% of Americans spend some amount of time working outside the traditional office environment.

Becoming a digital nomad or working on a remote job often means freelancing. Digital nomadism offers flexibility to make your own schedule and take on work at a rate that suits your lifestyle. Use a site like Upwork, Fiverr, or TakeLessons.com to list your freelance skills, qualifications, and portfolio of work. Find jobs that are remote only on WeWorkRemotely or Remote.co. If you know you’ll be moving frequently and on the road for a long time, digital nomadism might be the lifestyle you’re seeking.

Earn Money Traveling Abroad

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Au pair for a family

A great way to travel and also get deeper into the culture of a new country is to au pair while you’re traveling. Au pairs are hired to take care of small children as live-in babysitters. In the US, one au pair reports, “You get a private room in [the host family’s] house, eat their food and often receive a mobile phone and even a car to use in your free time. On top of all these things, you get a weekly salary of $195.75.” Au pair-ing can be a good way to make some money, cover your accommodation expenses, and get to know what real life is like in the country you’re visiting. Stick with a trusted agency like Go AuPair to make sure you’re working for a family that’s been vetted.

Work in a hostel

Working in a hostel is another good way to get your accommodation paid for (usually) and earn money on the side. “All the staff become like your family, the hostel starts to feel like your home and you are forever meeting awesome travelers!” writes one nomad who worked in hostels while traveling. There are many types of positions on offer at hostels, from working in reception to bar-tending to tour guiding. It’s a great way to meet fellow travelers and get to know the city in which you’re staying. To get started, look for jobs on Hosteljobs.net or read Hostelworld’s guide on How to find a job in a hostel and earn money.

Tutor or teach a skill

English is one of the more popular languages, but if you don’t have that in your arsenal, don’t let that discourage you. Look for an expat community in your hometown with young kids. Some families want tutors for their children to help them retain their traditions, language, and culture. Others like having English from someone who speaks their native language and can explain what words mean more clearly. One of the highest paying teaching jobs available in Vietnam is teaching swim lessons in expat communities. Be creative and think about some other topics you can teach beyond language skills: tutors are always in demand all over the world.

Become a tour guide 

Putting together a tour can be a lot of work, but it’s also quite lucrative. If you have a certain background or skill set, use that to your advantage. Think outside the traditional walking tours: are you a runner or cyclist? Plan a running tour of the city that takes you around the top sites while getting your guests in shape. If you know a lot about architecture or street art, plan a route that shows off a new side to your city. There are plenty of established companies to work with, but sites like Airbnb Experiences also make it easy to start up on your own.

Work as a translator

Translators are always in demand. “If you’re in a foreign country where native English-language speakers are needed, offer translation services. You can work with companies, contractors or individuals alike to translate for them,” writes career advisor FairyGodBoss. To get started as a translator you may need a certification, but also start posting your availability in Facebook groups. Word gets around quickly!


This article was originally published by SendFriend

About SendFriend:

In the aftermath of the devastating earthquake of 2010 that hit Haiti, our founder, David, was a young analyst at the Office of the Special Envoy to Haiti at the World Bank. He witnessed firsthand the resilience and strength of the worldwide Haitian community, as Haitians around the world sent home over $2 billion to support their loved ones in their time of need.

However, as Haitians stepped up their financial support, David saw money transfer companies charging more than 7% for people to send money home.

Visits to the Philippines exposed David to the global nature of this problem. As a student at MIT, he was inspired by blockchain technology and guided toward it by professors and technologists as a potential solution to the high cost of international remittances. The result was SendFriend, an international money transfer app specifically designed for money remittance to Philippines.

You May Also Like: The Simple Rules for Exchanging Foreign Currency


Featured Image Credits: Pixabay

Maybe you’re working overseas to send money back home. Or, maybe you found your dream job in a foreign country. Whatever motivated you to work abroad – dreams of a better future, a gap year before college, or an overseas assignment  – chances are there are challenges and obstacles you didn’t anticipate.

Navigating a new language, a new culture, and a new working environment comes with a learning curve that can be demoralizing at first. If you’re feeling stressed due to this transition, these tips are for you. Here’s how to maintain a positive attitude while working abroad.

Find your community

Your home away from home is often the people who make you feel most welcome. Find a way to meet people with similar interests to yours. Building a community can give you a welcome support system, or even distraction if you’re feeling a little homesick. “By volunteering, you’ll have something else to do, you’ll make a positive difference, and you’ll also meet like-minded people. Plus, who knows where these new friendships will lead?” writes one expert.

How can you find your community? Use sites like Meetup and Facebook Events to workshops, happy hours, volunteer opportunities, and more. Join a club, a sports team, or a professional organization. Make it a priority to show up each week and connect with familiar faces – this can help you build your network and find the people who are going to help you stay positive.

Celebrate small wins 

When you’re just starting up in a new job and a new country, things seem hard at first. Learning where to shop, how to communicate, and what unspoken customs your workplace expects sometimes come with a steep learning curve. Day-to-day life can feel overwhelming as you get your feet under you and learn how your new home works.

As a result, it’s important to keep morale up by celebrating small wins. As the writers at GoAbroad say, “Something as simple as knowing your way to the grocery store or ordering a drink in the local language can be an accomplishment. If you redefine what success working abroad looks like for you, you’ll be able to celebrate these seemingly small (but actually kind of huge) accomplishments.”

Working Overseas

Image Credits: Pixabay

Reach out to people back home 

There’s a healthy balance between immersing yourself in your new life and staying in touch with your friends and family back home. On one hand, you want to commit to joining a community and forming friendships with your coworkers and neighbors. On the other hand, you don’t want to disappear completely from your loved ones in your home country. Many workers overseas find it helpful to have a dedicated weekly Skype session where they can be assured of a time to catch up with their friends and family. Others create a blog or a weekly email where they can keep in touch with the goings on in everyone’s life. Do what is working best for you to keep in touch with your loved ones without missing out on all the new experiences your new job has to offer.

Find something that reminds you of home

It can be shopping for your favorite breakfast cereal, listening to your local radio station from home through the internet, or just making your favorite recipe from Grandma. Take a little time to do something meaningful that you miss from your home country. If you’re near an embassy, check to see what events they put on for the public. Many embassies offer programming for expats, which can be a great way to meet other people and celebrate the things you love about your home culture.

Prepare for cultural differences

Sometimes, half the battle of staying positive is knowing what to expect. If you understand some of the key differences between your culture and your new home, it’s easier to integrate with your professional environment as well as your new community. Learn some basic vocabulary words, as well as customs around dining, greeting, and being on time. By showing that you’ve made an effort, your new coworkers can see your willingness to learn and help you adapt more quickly. Likewise, it saves you from potentially demoralizing embarrassing situations. As one expert on Monster.com advises, “Avoid being an expat casualty.”


This article was previously published on SendFriend.io

About SendFriend:

In the aftermath of the devastating earthquake of 2010 hit Haiti, our founder, David, was a young analyst at the Office of the Special Envoy to Haiti at the World Bank. He witnessed firsthand the resilience and strength of the worldwide Haitian community, as Haitians around the world sent home over $2 billion to support their loved ones in their time of need.

However, as Haitians stepped up their financial support, David saw money transfer companies charge exorbitant fees, north of 7% for people to send money home.

Visits to the Philippines exposed David to the global nature of this problem. As a student at MIT, he was inspired by blockchain technology and guided toward it by Professors and technologists as a potential solution to the high cost of international remittances. The result was SendFriend.


Featured Image Credits: Pixabay

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